Thursday, November 9, 2017

Infinity Mirrors

I'm in LA to see the hottest art show of the year, Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirrors at the Broad. The room above is called The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away.


All advance tickets for the run were gone within 90 minutes.
Dots Obsession: Love Transformed Into Dots

The exhibit consists of 6 small mirrored rooms with a few paintings and sculptures in the corridors between them. 
Your group of two to four gets 30 seconds in each. (No pressure.)
They are small but infinite. The ultimate selfie venue. Space really does seem to expand, momentarily. And then your time is up.

Kusama lived in New York in the 60s, and you can find evidence of her fondness for polka dots and obsessiveness 50 years ago. She called these cloth works accumulations.

Peering into a cube for a Vegas-like neon show. You can see your friends too.

This room, Aftermath of the Obliteration of Eternity, reminded us of fireflies. The lights dim and then come up. And then the door opens and it's time to go.

Fortunately, just as you leave the last room (All The Eternal Love I Have in The World for Pumpkins, where no photography is allowed because in DC someone broke one! so this is not my picture),

…the museum drops you into a gallery full of Yayoi's paintings.

Her recent art feels influenced by aboriginal dot paintings with a dose of Marimekko.

Some are protozoan. Others more abstract or psychological.

The colors are especially joyful.

Exit through the dot sticker room, where you can touch the furniture and take pictures of people

taking pictures of people.

Fritzi contemplates the tricycle.



Cousin Laurel gives Yayoi a thumbs up.

(You can still see the show in Atlanta, Cleveland, and Toronto next year. If you get the chance, it's worth the trip. The first infinity room is a permanent part of the Broad collection.)
***
On the way, we three native New Yorkers made a pastrami pilgrimage. I know it's heresy, but Langer's puts Katz's pastrami on rye to shame. Better service and prices too.

I'll leave you with this vibrant mural adorning the Museum of Contemporary Art, across from the Broad. Downtown LA is in the midst of another phase of reinvention, the ultimate California cycle. I love LA.






Videos from the Broad's website:


















Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Bayfront renaissance

Two boys arrived and ran to the aquarium tank. "Don't you remember what happened to Dory?" one of the moms threatened.

 The elevators at the Frost Science Center look like cellphones in Otter Boxes.
Upstairs in the aviary, white herons and egrets nest in the mangroves.
No roseate spoonbills though.
You get a great view from the top toward the Venetian Causeway and the cruise ships.  It's a brand new building, next door to the Perez art museum and American Airlines Arena. 

Do you know the difference between an alligator and a crocodile? Florida is one of the few places that has both.
Down a level, into the fish tank. 
Almost like snorkeling.
As always, the jellyfish were captivating.
 Dancers

 Zooming across the tank

Parachute jumper

A sprite
Embryonic forms

Moon jellies
 Mushrooms

Outside, there are solar "trees."
 Even the garage doors are science-y.

Exclusive Hello Kitty merchandise in the gift shop

Just for good measure, deconstructed key lime pie.

And a bit of gratuitous Art Deco on Biscayne.



Saturday, September 23, 2017

the inspiration for Disneyland

 I spent the day along the water. People go on boat tours, but my transit pass also included unlimited rides on the Harborbus aka superspeedy ferries.
 Everyone was out on the water today, including lots of tourists in these cute GoBoats.
I got off in the most touristy part of town and headed to Copenhagen's most famous attraction.
I was almost going to skip the Little Mermaid statue, until I read it had been a target for attacks over the years: doused with dye, beheaded. 

What kind of sick person politicizes a mermaid? Then I felt I had to go, as a feminist act.
There were a million people, with selfie sticks and worse. It was sad and hilarious at the same time.

I continued walking into Kastellet, the military compound, with its grassy lawns, windmills (just when you thought you'd finally gotten Danish vs Dutch straight!), and wedding photos.


It really is a lovely compound. Not a selfie stick to be found.
 This was one of two weddings I ran into.
I hopped a bus over to Stoget, a popular pedestrian mall. 
It was mobbed. People posing, shopping, singing.

Feeling overwhelmed, I ducked into the world's cutest cafe. 
Service was slow, but the tea was good, and besides, they had blankets.

Tivoli Gardens is the second oldest amusement park in the world, opened in 1843.
It was the inspiration for Disneyland, in case you're wondering about the Matterhorn, or the Hans Christian Andersen doll ride.

Tomorrow's the end of the summer season. After that, they switch to special events.
It's a pretty fabulous place, with more junk food than even I could eat. 
The sections are themed, with small cafes and gift shops and terrifying rides.
There are charming surprises too. 
I found a couple playing a marimba, near lights put up by Olafur Eliasson. And I loved the fact that this tea shop had a chandelier, right under the rollercoaster.
They have bands and a sound and light show and firepits where in true hygge fashion, you can gather with your friends and roast marshmallows. And just before midnight, spectacular fireworks.
 Like Beyonce concert fireworks.
 Truly dazzling.
 We were a really happy crowd, celebrating the last Saturday night of summer.
Change is in the air. Tomorrow I fly home to the States. I have a few last stops before I go, a few more thoughts on this question of happiness and which country does it best. But for now, just for tonight, let's savor the awe and wonder.